<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
Tinco Andringa wrote:
<blockquote
 cite="mid:2fd035f00903091511q321cb755xf8628fdf4a8f4b8e@mail.gmail.com"
 type="cite">
  <blockquote type="cite">
    <pre wrap="">Unfortunately Microsoft has a long history of confusion on this topic.
I remember back when IIS5 was being developed I implored the IIS team
make it possible to write filters as kernel modules. &nbsp;I insisted that
the extra kernel transitions needed to invoke my legacy encryption
filter was going to kill performance. &nbsp;Their reaction was 'No way! You
might blue-screen the machine!'. &nbsp;They never did understand that,
whether it was in user space or the kernel, if there was a fatal bug in
my filter the machine was no more useful than a doorstop.
    </pre>
  </blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->
Maybe but these kind of performance issues can usually be solved
through horizontal scaling, something which applications like Facebook
should have no problem with.
  </pre>
</blockquote>
Horizontal scaling is almost always the answer here.&nbsp; However the
question is not simply "Can I handle the load?", but rather "At what
cost per user can I handle the load?".&nbsp; Thus at a large enough scale
the efficiency of the request handling infrastructure can become
important.<br>
<br>
<blockquote
 cite="mid:2fd035f00903091511q321cb755xf8628fdf4a8f4b8e@mail.gmail.com"
 type="cite">
  <pre wrap="">Bluescreens on shared hosting boxes
however would be very bad, and the shared hosting market is very
important for webdevelopment frameworks to attract new developers.

That and maybe debugging issues, it's tough to debug something if it
keeps bluescreening on you. If a process dies because of a
segmentation fault, you just restart the process so it can resume work
while you figure out what happened. This is significantly less
downtime, which means especially much for hosting with uptime
guarantees.
  </pre>
</blockquote>
I totally agree with you.&nbsp; Where the goal is a broad range of
applications running on as little hardware as possible, fault isolation
is essential, even if it costs you performance (hence the business of
VMware).&nbsp; However sometimes when you're trying to scale a small range
of tightly controlled applications, the reverse is true, and
performance becomes more important than isolation.<br>
<br>
-- Jay<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
</body>
</html>