<div dir="ltr">Hey,<br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
As a follow-up to my question about the way in which Mono handles generic<br>
types (see "Handling of generics by Mono compiler" on January 15), please do<br>
you know whether the distinction being made by Mono between a generic type<br>
and the instance type corresponding to it is only of relevance to the<br>
compiler, or does it have real implications for an application-level<br>
developer? (This relates to the comment Marek Safar made in the previous<br>
thread, namely: "Compiled generic types always exist at least as open<br>
(generic) types, usually TypeContainer(s) but can at the same time exist as<br>
InflatedTypeSpec too when accesses from within the type.")<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>That's correct but all this applies to mcs internals only. Mono runtime handles this differently.</div><div> </div>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
I'm working on a static analysis tool, and it would arguably be quite<br>
helpful to blur the distinction between the two for the purposes of writing<br>
queries over the source code (i.e. query writers shouldn't necessarily have<br>
to know about compiler internals), but I'm loath to make that change if<br>
there's a practical difference between the two that's relevant even outside<br>
the compiler.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>That's should be possible when you don't need to define generic types or handle expressions like</div><div style>var a = typeof (Foo<,,,>);</div><div style>
<br></div><div style>Marek</div></div></div></div>