<HTML><BODY style="word-wrap: break-word; -khtml-nbsp-mode: space; -khtml-line-break: after-white-space; "><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV>If Apple step up to the plate on mono they will, I think, be pushing their own core technologies ( read : Cocoa) as well as mono. i think they may be interested in some version of the dumbarton project, if anything. Were mono to be the main platform for development on the Mac, then the OS/AppKit team would not be in a position to innovate for developers.. If you read Apple's spiel on it's newest operating system releases the marketing does not focus on just what is available for consumers, but what new technologies are available for developers - and this is standard marketing guff sold to everyone not just sold on specific developer mailing lists ( the latest such technology to be touted is Core Animations, a Cocoa framework for cool animations probably used in the iPhone).<DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV><DIV>It is a stretch to believe that they will create these technologies and immediately port them to mono ( which in any case could create a disconnect between the Apple mono api set and the standard api set).</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>The API defines the OS, to a large extent. As does the UI. </DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>That said, this year's WWDC is about  getting windows developers onto the Mac. I wonder if a senior representative on this list could point Apple developer connection to the possibilities of  using mono, Cocoa#, or Dumbarton/Objective C on the Mac  . I think Apple would be most amenable to promoting a mono back-end, and a cocoa front-end.</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>However, they may not be following the possibilities of mono on the Mac, at all, but this is the year to push it.</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>-- Eoin Norris</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV><BR><DIV><DIV>On 27 Mar 2007, at 03:13, Andrew Satori wrote:</DIV><BR class="Apple-interchange-newline"><BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><P style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px"><FONT face="Helvetica" size="3" style="font: 12.0px Helvetica"><SPAN class="Apple-converted-space"> </SPAN>Until a big <SPAN class="Apple-converted-space"> </SPAN></FONT></P> <P style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px"><FONT face="Helvetica" size="3" style="font: 12.0px Helvetica">player, (and I think that player almost *has* to be Apple) steps up, <SPAN class="Apple-converted-space"> </SPAN></FONT></P> <P style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px"><FONT face="Helvetica" size="3" style="font: 12.0px Helvetica">I don't think we'll ever get enough Mac specific resources to get <SPAN class="Apple-converted-space"> </SPAN></FONT></P> <P style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px"><FONT face="Helvetica" size="3" style="font: 12.0px Helvetica">Mono on the Mac to be a full peer to Mono on Linux.</FONT></P> </BLOCKQUOTE></DIV><BR></DIV></DIV></BODY></HTML>