<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">I have to agree. &nbsp;I haven't used Visual Studio before hardly, until this year when I've been working exclusively on a C#/.Net 2 project under VS2005 and the debugger is fantastic.<div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>Edit &amp; Continue, when you are running tests that can go on for hours, is invaluable. &nbsp;As is the simplicity you can inspect/change variable values etc.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>That being said, logging still has its place (such as looking for timing holes in multi-threaded code), but until there is a decent development environment for C# available for the Mac, I'll stick to Objective-C and X-Code for Mac specific stuff, and all other projects will stay in VS 2005 under VMWare, and therefore will be Windows only.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>Cheers</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>Russell<br><div><br><div><div>On 13 Nov 2007, at 16:08, Brock Reeve wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><br><font size="2" face="sans-serif">.NET was built by Microsoft. Microsoft does a real good job with their development tools. When I started work in Visual Studio I was blown away. Intellisense, integrated debugger, watch windows, thread windows. Windows developers where introduced to .NET on Windows with Visual Studio. They fell in love with .NET and the Visual Studio experience and now are looking to mono for the cross platform capabilities. I feel the majority of the mono users are ones coming from Windows.</font> <br></blockquote></div><br></div></div></body></html>