<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Hi,<div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>I am very keen to be able to develop entirely on the Mac OS X using Mono and would also like to see maybe a Cocoa# port of the MonoDevelop project but I guess that is not going to happen soon.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>So instead I make use of the Visual Studio Express (It is free after all) under a Parallels Windows XP environment. When you make use of the&nbsp;coherence&nbsp;feature you do not feel like you are developing in Windows. Which is good.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>Now on a side note, I have taken over maintenance of the C# Bundle for TextMate. Basically I have merged the original "Mono Bundle" and the "C Sharp Bundle" from the e Text Editor project on Windows. The new bundle is called "C# Bundle".</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>After merging the bundles, I have improved the syntax language to better highlight C# code. I have also added a number of snippets that reduce development time. I have also made all the original snippets&nbsp;consistent with the new snippets.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>The next task is to add commands that will perform compilation using Mono. However since I am also on Leopard I am waiting for the next Mono release before I start this.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>If you are a TextMate user then you can retrieve the bundle from the SVN repository at:</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span><a href="http://macromates.com/svn/Bundles/trunk/Review/Bundles/">http://macromates.com/svn/Bundles/trunk/Review/Bundles/</a></div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>I would welcome any feedback on the Bundle along with ideas for new snippets, commands etc.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>On the subject of JetBrains. When .NET first came out it was always thought they would migrate the IntelliJ IDEA onto .NET, but they decided not to compete with MS but rather extend with their ReSharper product. I doubt very much they would ever produce a .NET IDE now. If they did, I would certainly purchase it, as the IntelliJ IDEA was the best Java development environment.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>It was also mentioned that the mono debugger was not ported to Mac OS X. Does anyone know the reason for this not being ported? Is it just a matter of manpower?</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>Cheers</div><div>Matt</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div><br><div><div>On 14/11/2007, at 6:52 AM, Liam Coughlin wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "> <div>I value your anecdote, and offer anecdotal rebuttals.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>1) &nbsp;Most experienced dev's that I know find debuggers to be invaluable tools in exploring the runtime state of a problematic application, particularly in non-trivial apps -- long before an application reaches a production status. &nbsp;I know very few serious C# developers who do not use VS.NET basically exclusively.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>2) 90% of the code in non-trivial applications are not developed by high level resources -- the brunt bulk of the code is created by &nbsp;mid and entry level resources to whom a debugger is an invaluable tool.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>3) Most developers considering adoption are not experienced C# developers, and thus are unlikely to continue adoption or push it with any sort of vigor unless the tools are in place for them to easily and&nbsp;conveniently&nbsp;explore the runtime environment.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>You're right though -- this is&nbsp;becoming&nbsp;an opinion war, and we can spout testimonials, arguments from authority and straw mans at each other all day. &nbsp;The _fact_ remains that the toolset is incomplete, and statistically ( from this list and others ) most do not think that it's "good enough" in it's incomplete state.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><br><div><div>On Nov 13, 2007, at 11:37 AM, Sean Hignett wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">I think this thread as lost its value to the list. &nbsp;Its become an opinion session - and I am as guilty as all. This will be my last spam out.<div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>The last thing I will say is that when I was younger, I would have echo'd many of these sentiments. &nbsp;I have been developing with Visual Studio since version 1.0. &nbsp;I worked at MS for several years - before the smart guys retired and the influx of kids who thought it a badge of honor to be hired at MS (of which I am also guilty of being a member). &nbsp;Many of the smartest devs at MS didn't even use VS.NET, some did, but a surprising number favored lighter weight tools - even emacs. &nbsp;That was in the pre-Vista era, so I expect those folks are gone - and from the look of Vista, VS.NET was used a lot.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>VS.NET has a rich tool set - but it has become a bit bloated these days as they try to find new things to stuff in - and for all of its features, it isn't very flexible - you do things the VS.NET way... it has become the IDE for kids who don't know what a command line is. &nbsp;The point-and-click MCSD generation.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>I used to laugh at the devs at MS that used emacs. &nbsp;Now I am one of them (sort of), because I too dumped VS.NET for a more lightweight, cross-platform IDE. &nbsp;I doubt many of the Mono devs use VS.NET or Monodevelop... my guess is the hardcore ones use emacs or some variant. &nbsp;</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>Most of the experienced devs I know (and I mean years of experience delivering non-trivial software (one friend used to write brain scan imaging routines for german MRI company)), don't consider debugging as important as tracing. &nbsp;For all the problems people have cited in this thread, their problem was more to do with incomplete tracing code then with the abscence of a debugger. &nbsp;Good trace code will show most of what is required, and it can be used in production, where you really need it. &nbsp;Step through debugging is a novice approach - most folks with time in the trenches use debuggers for a sort of profiling - seeing running threads, stack depth, etc. &nbsp;The sort of stuff tracing doesn't reflect well. &nbsp;But they rarely step through code.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>It will be nice when mono-debugger is ported to OSX, but it isn't the end of the world not to have it. &nbsp;I'd personally rather have JetBrains team up with Mono and give us a nice x-plat profiler :)</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>Cheers,</div><div>Sean</div><div><br><div><div>On 13-Nov-07, at 9:08 AM, Brock Reeve wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><br><font size="2" face="sans-serif">.NET was built by Microsoft. Microsoft does a real good job with their development tools. When I started work in Visual Studio I was blown away. Intellisense, integrated debugger, watch windows, thread windows. Windows developers where introduced to .NET on Windows with Visual Studio. They fell in love with .NET and the Visual Studio experience and now are looking to mono for the cross platform capabilities. I feel the majority of the mono users are ones coming from Windows.</font> <br> <br><font size="2" face="sans-serif">I am one of those users. I too am struggling with developing on the Mac with Mono. I think we can all agree the development experience (from a Windows perspective) is bad. Recently, I was experimenting with adding some theme support for the Windows Forms stuff on the Mac. I would build on windows and then run on the Mac using a shared drive and writelines to debug. It was a frustrating and time consuming process to hunt down issues (I desperately wanted to set a breakpoint). This experience soured my desire to contribute to the Windows Forms effort on the Mac.</font> <br> <br><font size="2" face="sans-serif">I think the success of Mono is strictly tied to the development experience on non windows platforms. I also think the success of Mono depends on how well the development experience is for the Mac because I believe Mono will get more developers using the Mac than Linux. This is due to the rising popularity of the Mac and Windows developers are looking at ways to take their .NET skills and apps to the Mac. They (Mono) will also get more visibility on the Mac by having apps run well on it.</font> <br> <br><font size="2" face="sans-serif">I like mono and see great potiential. I just see a gap in the development tools and I don't want to see this gap being labeled as ok. The mono community will thrive, the barrier to get started developing with mono tools will become lower, and more patches will be committed if the development tools are there. We need to build the foundation with good development tools.</font> <br> <br><font size="2" face="sans-serif">Brock</font> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <table width="100%"> <tbody><tr valign="top"><td width="40%"><font size="1" face="sans-serif"><b>Liam Coughlin &lt;<a href="mailto:lscoughlin@mac.com">lscoughlin@mac.com</a>&gt;</b> </font> <br><font size="1" face="sans-serif">Sent by: <a href="mailto:mono-osx-bounces@lists.ximian.com">mono-osx-bounces@lists.ximian.com</a></font><p><font size="1" face="sans-serif">11/12/2007 01:20 PM</font> </p></td><td width="59%"> <table width="100%"> <tbody><tr valign="top"><td> <div align="right"><font size="1" face="sans-serif">To</font></div> </td><td><font size="1" face="sans-serif">Sean Hignett &lt;<a href="mailto:seanhig@geminibay.com">seanhig@geminibay.com</a>&gt;</font> </td></tr><tr valign="top"><td> <div align="right"><font size="1" face="sans-serif">cc</font></div> </td><td><font size="1" face="sans-serif">"Edward J. Sabol" &lt;<a href="mailto:sabol@alderaan.gsfc.nasa.gov">sabol@alderaan.gsfc.nasa.gov</a>&gt;, <a href="mailto:mono-osx@lists.ximian.com">mono-osx@lists.ximian.com</a>, <a href="mailto:stephen@devolutions.org">stephen@devolutions.org</a></font> </td></tr><tr valign="top"><td> <div align="right"><font size="1" face="sans-serif">Subject</font></div> </td><td><font size="1" face="sans-serif">Re: [Mono-osx] Mono development on OS X without a debugger? &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;(was &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Re: Mono on Leopard)</font></td></tr></tbody></table> <br> <table> <tbody><tr valign="top"><td> </td><td></td></tr></tbody></table> <br></td></tr></tbody></table> <br> <br> <br><font size="2"><tt>Yes, but all of this is lame work arounds for not actually having a &nbsp;<br> debugger on os x.<br> <br> I realize that an os x debugger is not currently a priority, but &nbsp;<br> don't pretend that mono on os x is really ready for much of anything &nbsp;<br> until that changes.<br> <br> <br> On Nov 10, 2007, at 12:13 AM, Sean Hignett wrote:<br> <br> &gt; log4net. &nbsp;it is better then a debugger because it can be toggled on or<br> &gt; off at any time - even during user testing.<br> &gt;<br> &gt; don't leave home (or your ide) without it.<br> &gt;<br> &gt; On 9-Nov-07, at 9:45 PM, Edward J. Sabol wrote:<br> &gt;<br> &gt;&gt; Stephen Rylander asked:<br> &gt;&gt;&gt; Ed, I'm curious how you, or others, are making full use of Mono on<br> &gt;&gt;&gt; OS X without a debugger? I really want to use Mono more, being an<br> &gt;&gt;&gt; experienced C# developer, but the lack of a debugger freaks me out.<br> &gt;&gt;&gt; I'd really appreciate any and all thoughts on the subject.<br> &gt;&gt;<br> &gt;&gt; Stephen, I know it sounds archaic, but I basically just add a &nbsp;<br> &gt;&gt; bunch of<br> &gt;&gt; WriteLn's to the code until it works the way I expect. (Actually, I<br> &gt;&gt; have a<br> &gt;&gt; "Logger" class which facilitates this and writes the info to a log<br> &gt;&gt; file if<br> &gt;&gt; and only if debug mode is turned on.) As a long-time Web CGI and<br> &gt;&gt; JavaScript<br> &gt;&gt; developer, I guess I'm just kind of used to this method of<br> &gt;&gt; debugging, so it<br> &gt;&gt; doesn't bother me. I'm not sure I'd advise employing this<br> &gt;&gt; methodology with<br> &gt;&gt; GUI development though.<br> &gt;&gt;<br> &gt;&gt; If you really want a C# debugger, you could always use VMWare or<br> &gt;&gt; Parallels on<br> &gt;&gt; Mac OS X to run a Windows or Linux debugger on an as-needed basis, I<br> &gt;&gt; suppose....<br> &gt;&gt;<br> &gt;&gt; Hope this helps,<br> &gt;&gt; Ed<br> &gt;&gt; _______________________________________________<br> &gt;&gt; Mono-osx mailing list<br> &gt;&gt; <a href="mailto:Mono-osx@lists.ximian.com">Mono-osx@lists.ximian.com</a><br> &gt;&gt; <a href="http://lists.ximian.com/mailman/listinfo/mono-osx">http://lists.ximian.com/mailman/listinfo/mono-osx</a><br> &gt;<br> &gt; _______________________________________________<br> &gt; Mono-osx mailing list<br> &gt; <a href="mailto:Mono-osx@lists.ximian.com">Mono-osx@lists.ximian.com</a><br> &gt; <a href="http://lists.ximian.com/mailman/listinfo/mono-osx">http://lists.ximian.com/mailman/listinfo/mono-osx</a><br> <br> _______________________________________________<br> Mono-osx mailing list<br> <a href="mailto:Mono-osx@lists.ximian.com">Mono-osx@lists.ximian.com</a><br> <a href="http://lists.ximian.com/mailman/listinfo/mono-osx">http://lists.ximian.com/mailman/listinfo/mono-osx</a><br> </tt></font> <br></blockquote></div><br></div></blockquote></div><br></div>_______________________________________________<br>Mono-osx mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Mono-osx@lists.ximian.com">Mono-osx@lists.ximian.com</a><br>http://lists.ximian.com/mailman/listinfo/mono-osx<br></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>